NeuroSKILL’s Study Day at Neuroscience Ireland 2013

Professor William Molloy (UCC) explains the research behind his quick MCI assessment tool.

Professor William Molloy (UCC) explains the research behind his quick MCI assessment tool.

NeuroSKILL held a study day, Neuroimaging: Applications to Normal Ageing and Alzheimer’s Disease,  on September 11th, 2013 at University College Cork with a wide range of speakers, both clinicians and academics from Ireland and Wales, who presented the latest clinical and research developments on Alzheimer’s disease. Among the highlights were Prof William Molloy’s and Dr Ronan O Caoimh’s talk about the latest developments of a quick and sensitive screening tool for Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI).

Other areas covered by speakers included magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology (Dr Jonathan McNulty), brain chemistry (Dr Paul Mullins and Ms Karolina Rusiak), and functional brain changes due to Alzheimer’s disease (Prof Arun Bokde), and theory and application of diffusion imaging (DTI) to investigate brain changes in Alzheimer’s disease patients (Dr Elizabeth Kehoe). Dr Catherine Quinn discussed the new developments in definition of Alzheimer’s disease and the non-pharmacological strategies that are being investigated to prevent Alzheimer’s disease as well as improve quality of life for patients.

Professor Arun Bokde (TCD) addresses the delegates at the UCC Study Day

Professor Arun Bokde (TCD) addresses the delegates at the UCC Study Day

The study day was held in conjunction with the Annual Meeting of Neuroscience Ireland and the NeuroSKILL event attracted many post-graduate students and researchers. Delegates came from across Ireland and also included GPs, psychiatrists, radiographers, academics, nurses and a strong turnout from the field of psychology. More than 50 delegates attended the day-long training event and feedback from the event was overwhelmingly positive, with many participants expressing an interest in future NeuroSKILL training activities.

The NeuroSKILL project, funded by European Regional Development Fund through the Ireland Wales Programme 2007-13, is a collaboration between Trinity College Dublin, University College Dublin, and Bangor University which will involve the development of training programmes in neuroimaging in dementia, technology transfer and research and development in neuroimaging technologies.